Biochemical and molecular characterization of common UTI pathogen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The members of family Enterobacteriaceae, are the most frequent pathogens detected, causing 84.3% of the UTIs (Gales et al. 1998). The organisms causing UTIs during pregnancy are the same as those found in non-pregnant patients. E. coli accounts for 80–90% infections (Hart et al. 1996) inclusive of about 85% of community acquired UTIs, 50% of nosocomial UTIs and more than 80% of uncomplicated pyelonephritis (Bergerson 1995). These E. coli may be endogenous flora of the colon, first colonize the periurethral area and vaginal introitus, then ascend to the bladder and from the bladder to the renal pelvis by receptor mediated ascending process. The process involves both host and bacterial factors, namely tissue receptors and expression of bacterial attachment factors (Nowicki 1996). A vacuolating cytotoxin expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, elicits defined damage to kidney epithelium (Guyer et al. 2002). The medically equally important enterobacteriaceae genus Klebsiella accounts for 6–17% of all nosocomial UTIs and shows an even higher incidence in specific groups of patients at risk (Bennet et al. 1995). Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of UTI in individuals with long term urinary catheters in place or individuals with complicated UTIs. Some UTIs are caused by other less common types of bacteria (Hillebrand et al. 2002).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages23-46
Number of pages24
Edition9789811047497
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Publication series

NameSpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology
Number9789811047497
ISSN (Print)2191-530X
ISSN (Electronic)2191-5318

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Pathogens
Enterobacteriaceae
Escherichia coli
Escherichia Coli
Urinary Bladder
Uropathogenic Escherichia coli
Proteus mirabilis
Urinary Catheters
Receptor
Kidney Pelvis
Klebsiella
Pyelonephritis
Cytotoxins
Thromboplastin
Colon
Epithelium
Catheters
Pregnancy
Kidney
Bacteria

Cite this

Fatima, S. S., & Mussaed, E. A. (2018). Biochemical and molecular characterization of common UTI pathogen. In SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology (9789811047497 ed., pp. 23-46). (SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology; No. 9789811047497). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4750-3_2
Fatima, Syeda Sograh ; Mussaed, Eman Al. / Biochemical and molecular characterization of common UTI pathogen. SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology. 9789811047497. ed. Springer Verlag, 2018. pp. 23-46 (SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology; 9789811047497).
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Fatima, SS & Mussaed, EA 2018, Biochemical and molecular characterization of common UTI pathogen. in SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology. 9789811047497 edn, SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology, no. 9789811047497, Springer Verlag, pp. 23-46. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4750-3_2

Biochemical and molecular characterization of common UTI pathogen. / Fatima, Syeda Sograh; Mussaed, Eman Al.

SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology. 9789811047497. ed. Springer Verlag, 2018. p. 23-46 (SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology; No. 9789811047497).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Fatima SS, Mussaed EA. Biochemical and molecular characterization of common UTI pathogen. In SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology. 9789811047497 ed. Springer Verlag. 2018. p. 23-46. (SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology; 9789811047497). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4750-3_2