Ecological determinants of intestinal parasitic infections among pre-school children in an urban squatter settlement of Egypt

Ahmed A.R. Mahfouz, Hala El-Morshedy, Azza Farghaly, Amir Khalil

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30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Population growth in Egypt has led to the creation of several urban squatter settlements. The aim of the present work was to study the prevalence and some potential risk factors of intestinal parasitic infections among preschool children in a randomly chosen urban squatter settlement in Alexandria, Egypt. A house to house cross-sectional survey was conducted during late 1995. Data were collected through questionnaire interview regarding socio-demographic and environmental conditions from 1324 families residing in the settlement. Stool samples were collected from 658 preschool children below 5 years of age and examined for intestinal parasites. Overall, the prevalence rates of infections with the intestinal Helminths and Protozoa were 47.3 and 31.5 per cent, respectively, which were very high compared to previously reported figures for this age group in Egypt. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that certain groups of preschool children were much more likely to develop the infection with both groups of intestinal parasites. They included children over 2 years of age (OR = 2.75, 95 per cent CI = 1.23-4.12 and OR = 2.65, 95 per cent CI = 1.70-3.45 for Helminths and Protozoa, respectively), whose families had pools of sewage around houses (OR = 2.13, 95 per cent CI = 1.22-3.19 and OR = 2.83, 95 per cent CI = 1.45-3.95 for helminths and protozoa, respectively) and shared toilets with another family (OR = 1.95, 95 per cent CI = 1.38-2.75 and OR = 1.65, 95 per cent CI = 1.06-2.58 for Helminths and Protozoa, respectively). In addition, certain groups of children were much likely to develop protozoal infections including children whose families lacked tap water inside dwelling (OR = 1.85, 95 per cent CI = 1.26-2.77) and disposed human excreta in septic tank very close to the dwelling (OR = 2.17, 95 per cent CI = 1.43-3.75). Efforts to reduce intestinal parasites should focus on reducing exposures. Improvement in domestic water supplies with the introduction of piped sewerage system is likely to have a marked decreasing effect on the prevalence of infection among this age group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-344
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Tropical Pediatrics
Volume43
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1997

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Parasitic Diseases
Egypt
Helminths
Preschool Children
Parasites
Infection
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Water Supply
Population Growth
Sewage
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
Interviews
Water

Cite this

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title = "Ecological determinants of intestinal parasitic infections among pre-school children in an urban squatter settlement of Egypt",
abstract = "Population growth in Egypt has led to the creation of several urban squatter settlements. The aim of the present work was to study the prevalence and some potential risk factors of intestinal parasitic infections among preschool children in a randomly chosen urban squatter settlement in Alexandria, Egypt. A house to house cross-sectional survey was conducted during late 1995. Data were collected through questionnaire interview regarding socio-demographic and environmental conditions from 1324 families residing in the settlement. Stool samples were collected from 658 preschool children below 5 years of age and examined for intestinal parasites. Overall, the prevalence rates of infections with the intestinal Helminths and Protozoa were 47.3 and 31.5 per cent, respectively, which were very high compared to previously reported figures for this age group in Egypt. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that certain groups of preschool children were much more likely to develop the infection with both groups of intestinal parasites. They included children over 2 years of age (OR = 2.75, 95 per cent CI = 1.23-4.12 and OR = 2.65, 95 per cent CI = 1.70-3.45 for Helminths and Protozoa, respectively), whose families had pools of sewage around houses (OR = 2.13, 95 per cent CI = 1.22-3.19 and OR = 2.83, 95 per cent CI = 1.45-3.95 for helminths and protozoa, respectively) and shared toilets with another family (OR = 1.95, 95 per cent CI = 1.38-2.75 and OR = 1.65, 95 per cent CI = 1.06-2.58 for Helminths and Protozoa, respectively). In addition, certain groups of children were much likely to develop protozoal infections including children whose families lacked tap water inside dwelling (OR = 1.85, 95 per cent CI = 1.26-2.77) and disposed human excreta in septic tank very close to the dwelling (OR = 2.17, 95 per cent CI = 1.43-3.75). Efforts to reduce intestinal parasites should focus on reducing exposures. Improvement in domestic water supplies with the introduction of piped sewerage system is likely to have a marked decreasing effect on the prevalence of infection among this age group.",
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Ecological determinants of intestinal parasitic infections among pre-school children in an urban squatter settlement of Egypt. / Mahfouz, Ahmed A.R.; El-Morshedy, Hala; Farghaly, Azza; Khalil, Amir.

In: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, Vol. 43, No. 6, 01.01.1997, p. 341-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Population growth in Egypt has led to the creation of several urban squatter settlements. The aim of the present work was to study the prevalence and some potential risk factors of intestinal parasitic infections among preschool children in a randomly chosen urban squatter settlement in Alexandria, Egypt. A house to house cross-sectional survey was conducted during late 1995. Data were collected through questionnaire interview regarding socio-demographic and environmental conditions from 1324 families residing in the settlement. Stool samples were collected from 658 preschool children below 5 years of age and examined for intestinal parasites. Overall, the prevalence rates of infections with the intestinal Helminths and Protozoa were 47.3 and 31.5 per cent, respectively, which were very high compared to previously reported figures for this age group in Egypt. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that certain groups of preschool children were much more likely to develop the infection with both groups of intestinal parasites. They included children over 2 years of age (OR = 2.75, 95 per cent CI = 1.23-4.12 and OR = 2.65, 95 per cent CI = 1.70-3.45 for Helminths and Protozoa, respectively), whose families had pools of sewage around houses (OR = 2.13, 95 per cent CI = 1.22-3.19 and OR = 2.83, 95 per cent CI = 1.45-3.95 for helminths and protozoa, respectively) and shared toilets with another family (OR = 1.95, 95 per cent CI = 1.38-2.75 and OR = 1.65, 95 per cent CI = 1.06-2.58 for Helminths and Protozoa, respectively). In addition, certain groups of children were much likely to develop protozoal infections including children whose families lacked tap water inside dwelling (OR = 1.85, 95 per cent CI = 1.26-2.77) and disposed human excreta in septic tank very close to the dwelling (OR = 2.17, 95 per cent CI = 1.43-3.75). Efforts to reduce intestinal parasites should focus on reducing exposures. Improvement in domestic water supplies with the introduction of piped sewerage system is likely to have a marked decreasing effect on the prevalence of infection among this age group.

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