Effets de la formation sur la violence conjugale

Révision systématique d'études randomisées contrôlées

Translated title of the contribution: Effect of domestic violence training: Systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Eman Zaher, Kelly Keogh, Savithiri Ratnapalan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe and evaluate the effectiveness of domestic violence education in improving physicians' knowledge, recognition, and management of abused women. Data sources: The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, and EMBASE were searched for articles published between January 1, 2000, and November 1, 2012. This search was supplemented by manual searches for relevant articles using a combined text-word and MeSH-heading search strategy. Study selection: Randomized controlled trials were selected that used educational interventions among physicians and provided data on the effects of the interventions. Synthesis: Nine randomized controlled trials were included that described different educational approaches with various outcome measures. Three studies examined the effects of educational interventions among postgraduate trainee physicians and found an increase in knowledge but no change in behaviour with regard to identifying victims of domestic violence. Six studies examined educational interventions for practising physicians. Three of these studies used multifaceted physician training that combined education with system support interventions to change physician behaviour, such as increasing general awareness of domestic violence with brochures and posters, providing aids to remind physicians how to identify victims, facilitating physician access to victim support services, and providing audits and feedback. Multifaceted educational interventions included interactive workshops, Web-based learning, and experiential training. Another study used focus-group discussions and training, and showed improved domestic violence reporting among physicians. The remaining 2 studies showed improved perceptions of practising physicians' self-efficacy using problem-based online learning. Conclusion: It was difficult to determine the most effective educational strategy, as the educational interventions and the outcome measures varied among the selected studies. Brief interventions for postgraduate trainee physicians improved knowledge but did not seem to affect behaviour. Online education using a problem-based learning format improved practising physicians' perceptions, knowledge, and skills in managing domestic violence. Physician training combined with system support interventions seemed to benefit domestic violence victims and increase referrals to domestic violence support resources.

Original languageFrench
JournalCanadian Family Physician
Volume60
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

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Domestic Violence
Randomized Controlled Trials
Physicians
Problem-Based Learning
Education
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Medical Subject Headings
Battered Women
Knowledge Management
Posters
Pamphlets
Information Storage and Retrieval
Self Efficacy
Focus Groups
PubMed
MEDLINE
Referral and Consultation

Cite this

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title = "Effets de la formation sur la violence conjugale: R{\'e}vision syst{\'e}matique d'{\'e}tudes randomis{\'e}es contr{\^o}l{\'e}es",
abstract = "Objective: To describe and evaluate the effectiveness of domestic violence education in improving physicians' knowledge, recognition, and management of abused women. Data sources: The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, and EMBASE were searched for articles published between January 1, 2000, and November 1, 2012. This search was supplemented by manual searches for relevant articles using a combined text-word and MeSH-heading search strategy. Study selection: Randomized controlled trials were selected that used educational interventions among physicians and provided data on the effects of the interventions. Synthesis: Nine randomized controlled trials were included that described different educational approaches with various outcome measures. Three studies examined the effects of educational interventions among postgraduate trainee physicians and found an increase in knowledge but no change in behaviour with regard to identifying victims of domestic violence. Six studies examined educational interventions for practising physicians. Three of these studies used multifaceted physician training that combined education with system support interventions to change physician behaviour, such as increasing general awareness of domestic violence with brochures and posters, providing aids to remind physicians how to identify victims, facilitating physician access to victim support services, and providing audits and feedback. Multifaceted educational interventions included interactive workshops, Web-based learning, and experiential training. Another study used focus-group discussions and training, and showed improved domestic violence reporting among physicians. The remaining 2 studies showed improved perceptions of practising physicians' self-efficacy using problem-based online learning. Conclusion: It was difficult to determine the most effective educational strategy, as the educational interventions and the outcome measures varied among the selected studies. Brief interventions for postgraduate trainee physicians improved knowledge but did not seem to affect behaviour. Online education using a problem-based learning format improved practising physicians' perceptions, knowledge, and skills in managing domestic violence. Physician training combined with system support interventions seemed to benefit domestic violence victims and increase referrals to domestic violence support resources.",
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Effets de la formation sur la violence conjugale : Révision systématique d'études randomisées contrôlées. / Zaher, Eman; Keogh, Kelly; Ratnapalan, Savithiri.

In: Canadian Family Physician, Vol. 60, No. 7, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Effets de la formation sur la violence conjugale

T2 - Révision systématique d'études randomisées contrôlées

AU - Zaher, Eman

AU - Keogh, Kelly

AU - Ratnapalan, Savithiri

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Objective: To describe and evaluate the effectiveness of domestic violence education in improving physicians' knowledge, recognition, and management of abused women. Data sources: The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, and EMBASE were searched for articles published between January 1, 2000, and November 1, 2012. This search was supplemented by manual searches for relevant articles using a combined text-word and MeSH-heading search strategy. Study selection: Randomized controlled trials were selected that used educational interventions among physicians and provided data on the effects of the interventions. Synthesis: Nine randomized controlled trials were included that described different educational approaches with various outcome measures. Three studies examined the effects of educational interventions among postgraduate trainee physicians and found an increase in knowledge but no change in behaviour with regard to identifying victims of domestic violence. Six studies examined educational interventions for practising physicians. Three of these studies used multifaceted physician training that combined education with system support interventions to change physician behaviour, such as increasing general awareness of domestic violence with brochures and posters, providing aids to remind physicians how to identify victims, facilitating physician access to victim support services, and providing audits and feedback. Multifaceted educational interventions included interactive workshops, Web-based learning, and experiential training. Another study used focus-group discussions and training, and showed improved domestic violence reporting among physicians. The remaining 2 studies showed improved perceptions of practising physicians' self-efficacy using problem-based online learning. Conclusion: It was difficult to determine the most effective educational strategy, as the educational interventions and the outcome measures varied among the selected studies. Brief interventions for postgraduate trainee physicians improved knowledge but did not seem to affect behaviour. Online education using a problem-based learning format improved practising physicians' perceptions, knowledge, and skills in managing domestic violence. Physician training combined with system support interventions seemed to benefit domestic violence victims and increase referrals to domestic violence support resources.

AB - Objective: To describe and evaluate the effectiveness of domestic violence education in improving physicians' knowledge, recognition, and management of abused women. Data sources: The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, and EMBASE were searched for articles published between January 1, 2000, and November 1, 2012. This search was supplemented by manual searches for relevant articles using a combined text-word and MeSH-heading search strategy. Study selection: Randomized controlled trials were selected that used educational interventions among physicians and provided data on the effects of the interventions. Synthesis: Nine randomized controlled trials were included that described different educational approaches with various outcome measures. Three studies examined the effects of educational interventions among postgraduate trainee physicians and found an increase in knowledge but no change in behaviour with regard to identifying victims of domestic violence. Six studies examined educational interventions for practising physicians. Three of these studies used multifaceted physician training that combined education with system support interventions to change physician behaviour, such as increasing general awareness of domestic violence with brochures and posters, providing aids to remind physicians how to identify victims, facilitating physician access to victim support services, and providing audits and feedback. Multifaceted educational interventions included interactive workshops, Web-based learning, and experiential training. Another study used focus-group discussions and training, and showed improved domestic violence reporting among physicians. The remaining 2 studies showed improved perceptions of practising physicians' self-efficacy using problem-based online learning. Conclusion: It was difficult to determine the most effective educational strategy, as the educational interventions and the outcome measures varied among the selected studies. Brief interventions for postgraduate trainee physicians improved knowledge but did not seem to affect behaviour. Online education using a problem-based learning format improved practising physicians' perceptions, knowledge, and skills in managing domestic violence. Physician training combined with system support interventions seemed to benefit domestic violence victims and increase referrals to domestic violence support resources.

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M3 - Review article

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JO - Canadian Family Physician

JF - Canadian Family Physician

SN - 0008-350X

IS - 7

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