Is salivary IgA level a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Fawad Javed, Zohaib Akram, Munerah Saleh Binshabaib, Shatha Subhi ALHarthi, Sergio Varela Kellesarian, Fahim Vohra

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether or not assessment of salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels could be a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children. The Patient, Exposure, Comparative, Outcome question was “Is sIgA level a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children?” Electronic and manual literature searches were conducted in indexed databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, and SCOPUS databases) up to and including June 2017. The primary outcome was total mean salivary levels of IgA among HIV seropositive and seronegative children (controls). The weighted mean differences (WMD) of outcomes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for total mean salivary IgA levels were calculated using a random effect model. Six studies were included. Three studies showed significantly lower salivary IgA levels in HIV-infected children compared with controls. Two studies showed comparable IgA levels in HIV infected and controls. One study showed significantly higher levels of salivary IgA in HIV-infected children as compared to controls. Considering the total mean salivary IgA levels among HIV seropositive and seronegative children, a high degree of heterogeneity (Q value = 254.09, P <.0001, I2 = 98.82%) was noticed among both groups. The overall WMD was not significant (WMD = −1.18, 95% CI, −1.91 to −0.44, P =.39). Whether salivary IgA level is a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children remains debatable because of limited information available in the current literature. Further, high-quality case-control studies with larger sample size and more solid methodological aspects are required.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1933
JournalReviews in Medical Virology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Immunosuppression
Immunoglobulin A
Meta-Analysis
Biomarkers
HIV
Secretory Immunoglobulin A
Databases
Confidence Intervals
PubMed
MEDLINE
Quality Control
Sample Size
Case-Control Studies

Keywords

  • children
  • human immunodeficiency virus
  • immunoglobulin A
  • saliva
  • systematic review

Cite this

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title = "Is salivary IgA level a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children? A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether or not assessment of salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels could be a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children. The Patient, Exposure, Comparative, Outcome question was “Is sIgA level a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children?” Electronic and manual literature searches were conducted in indexed databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, and SCOPUS databases) up to and including June 2017. The primary outcome was total mean salivary levels of IgA among HIV seropositive and seronegative children (controls). The weighted mean differences (WMD) of outcomes and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) for total mean salivary IgA levels were calculated using a random effect model. Six studies were included. Three studies showed significantly lower salivary IgA levels in HIV-infected children compared with controls. Two studies showed comparable IgA levels in HIV infected and controls. One study showed significantly higher levels of salivary IgA in HIV-infected children as compared to controls. Considering the total mean salivary IgA levels among HIV seropositive and seronegative children, a high degree of heterogeneity (Q value = 254.09, P <.0001, I2 = 98.82{\%}) was noticed among both groups. The overall WMD was not significant (WMD = −1.18, 95{\%} CI, −1.91 to −0.44, P =.39). Whether salivary IgA level is a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children remains debatable because of limited information available in the current literature. Further, high-quality case-control studies with larger sample size and more solid methodological aspects are required.",
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Is salivary IgA level a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children? A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Javed, Fawad; Akram, Zohaib; Binshabaib, Munerah Saleh; ALHarthi, Shatha Subhi; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Vohra, Fahim.

In: Reviews in Medical Virology, Vol. 27, No. 4, e1933, 01.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Javed, Fawad

AU - Akram, Zohaib

AU - Binshabaib, Munerah Saleh

AU - ALHarthi, Shatha Subhi

AU - Kellesarian, Sergio Varela

AU - Vohra, Fahim

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AB - The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether or not assessment of salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels could be a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children. The Patient, Exposure, Comparative, Outcome question was “Is sIgA level a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children?” Electronic and manual literature searches were conducted in indexed databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, and SCOPUS databases) up to and including June 2017. The primary outcome was total mean salivary levels of IgA among HIV seropositive and seronegative children (controls). The weighted mean differences (WMD) of outcomes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for total mean salivary IgA levels were calculated using a random effect model. Six studies were included. Three studies showed significantly lower salivary IgA levels in HIV-infected children compared with controls. Two studies showed comparable IgA levels in HIV infected and controls. One study showed significantly higher levels of salivary IgA in HIV-infected children as compared to controls. Considering the total mean salivary IgA levels among HIV seropositive and seronegative children, a high degree of heterogeneity (Q value = 254.09, P <.0001, I2 = 98.82%) was noticed among both groups. The overall WMD was not significant (WMD = −1.18, 95% CI, −1.91 to −0.44, P =.39). Whether salivary IgA level is a potential biomarker for immunosuppression in HIV-positive children remains debatable because of limited information available in the current literature. Further, high-quality case-control studies with larger sample size and more solid methodological aspects are required.

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