Knowledge, attitude and use of fluorides among dentists in Texas

Ritu Bansal, Kenneth A. Bolin, Hoda M. Abdellatif, Jay D. Shulman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The centers for disease control and prevention (CDC) recommendations on fluoride use were published in 2001. This study examines how this information has diffused to practicing dentists and the level of fluoride knowledge and use among Texas dentists. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was sent to dentists who self-identified as being in pediatric (343), dental public health (72), and general practices (980); a 12% sample of registered dentists in Texas. Results: Response rate was 42.9%. About 90% of surveyed dentists reported using fluorides routinely. Only 18.8% reported fluoride varnish as the topical fluoride most often used. About 57% incorrectly identified primary effect of fluoride. 'Makes enamel stronger while tooth is developing prior to eruption' was the most commonly cited wrong answer (44%). Only 5% identified that posteruptive effect exceeds any preeruptive effect. Conclusion: Despite the evidence for fluoride varnish preventing and controlling dental caries being Grade I, its use is still uncommon. Dentists are expected to be knowledgeable about products they use, but this study reflects lack of understanding about fluoride's predominant mode of action. More accurate understanding enables dentists to make informed and appropriate judgment on treatment options and effective use of fluoride based on risk assessment of dental caries. Clinical significance: Lack of knowledge of, or failure of adherence to evidence based guidelines in caries prevention by use of appropriate fluoride regimens may adversely affect caries incidence in the population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-375
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Contemporary Dental Practice
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Dentists
Fluorides
Topical Fluorides
Dental Caries
Tooth
Public Health Practice
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Dental Enamel
General Practice
Guidelines
Pediatrics
Incidence
Population

Keywords

  • Dental caries
  • Diffusion of innovation
  • Evidence-based dentistry
  • Fluorides
  • United states

Cite this

Bansal, Ritu ; Bolin, Kenneth A. ; Abdellatif, Hoda M. ; Shulman, Jay D. / Knowledge, attitude and use of fluorides among dentists in Texas. In: Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice. 2012 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 371-375.
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Knowledge, attitude and use of fluorides among dentists in Texas. / Bansal, Ritu; Bolin, Kenneth A.; Abdellatif, Hoda M.; Shulman, Jay D.

In: Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.01.2012, p. 371-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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