Virus induces metal-binding proteins and changed trace element balance in the brain during the course of a common human infection (coxsackievirus B3) in mice

Nils Gunnar Ilbäck, Peter Frisk, Nahla Mohamed, Inga Lill Gadhasson, Jonas Blomberg, Göran Friman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autopsy of the brain has shown a change in trace element balance in some virus-infected individuals, but it is not known whether this event was a result of the infection. In the present study coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) adapted to Balb/c mice was used to study whether infection induces gene expression of the metal-binding/transporting proteins metallothionein (MT1 and MT3) and divalent-metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and whether it changes the balance of trace elements in the brain. Virus and MT1, MT3, and DMT1 were quantitatively measured by RT-PCR on days 3, 6 and 9 of the infection. Trace elements (13) were measured in serum and the brain by ICP-MS. High numbers of virus were found in the brain on days 3 and 6, but virus counts were decreased and present only in 50% of the mice on day 9. Gene expression of MT1 tended to increase on all days, whereas that of MT3 only showed a minor and not significant increase on day 3. No clear effect was observed in the expression of DMT1. The increase of MT3 was correlated to the brain concentration of Cu. The Cu/Zn ratio in serum increased as a response to the infection. There was a similar decrease in Cd in serum and the brain. On day 6 of the infection, Hg increased in the brain (p < 0.05) and was positively correlated to a concomitant decrease (p < 0.05) in serum. Virus numbers in the brain were on day 6 positively correlated (p < 0.05) to As concentrations. Enteroviral infections may therefore be an underlying factor regarding the changes in essential as well as potentially toxic trace elements in the brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-98
Number of pages11
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume381
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2007

Fingerprint

metal binding
Trace Elements
Trace elements
Viruses
brain
Brain
virus
Carrier Proteins
Metals
trace element
protein
serum
Gene expression
gene expression
metal
infection
metallothionein
Metallothionein
Poisons

Keywords

  • Brain
  • DMT1
  • MT1
  • MT3
  • Trace elements
  • Virus

Cite this

Ilbäck, Nils Gunnar ; Frisk, Peter ; Mohamed, Nahla ; Gadhasson, Inga Lill ; Blomberg, Jonas ; Friman, Göran. / Virus induces metal-binding proteins and changed trace element balance in the brain during the course of a common human infection (coxsackievirus B3) in mice. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2007 ; Vol. 381, No. 1-3. pp. 88-98.
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Virus induces metal-binding proteins and changed trace element balance in the brain during the course of a common human infection (coxsackievirus B3) in mice. / Ilbäck, Nils Gunnar; Frisk, Peter; Mohamed, Nahla; Gadhasson, Inga Lill; Blomberg, Jonas; Friman, Göran.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 381, No. 1-3, 01.08.2007, p. 88-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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